The Department of Veterans Affairs offers the Specially Adapted Housing Grant, or a 2101(a) grant intended for disabled veterans. This grant is meant to offset the cost of specially adapted housing.

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Bruce Reichstein is an Expert on (VA) Military/Veteran Home Loan Guidelines for over 26 years — www.VALoans.com. He is an experienced VA Loan Mortgage Banker who is passionate about assisting US Military Veterans utilize their Veteran Eligibility to purchase a home.

VA Specially Adapted Housing Grants

The Department of Veterans Affairs offers the Specially Adapted Housing Grant, or a 2101(a) grant intended for disabled veterans. This grant is meant to offset the cost of specially adapted housing. According to VA requirements, those eligible for this grant are those entitled to or currently receiving VA compensation for what the Department of Veterans Affairs defines as "permanent and total" service-connected disability.

But what disabilities qualify for this VA grant money? According to the VA, every circumstance is different and while a veteran needs to have his or her case reviewed individually to be considered, the VA does publish a list that shows who is "basically eligible" for the 2101(a).

Veterans who meet the conditions on this list aren't automatically eligible--all medical conditions listed below do qualify "as determined by the VA". This means the veteran must have VA documentation and definition of the conditions listed below:

  • Loss, or loss of use of both lower extremities such as to preclude locomotion without the aid of braces, crutches, canes, or a wheelchair.

  • Blindness in both eyes having only light perception, plus loss or loss of use of one lower extremity.

  • The loss, or loss of use, of one lower extremity together with residuals of organic disease or injury, or the loss or loss of use of one upper extremity. These injuries must, according to VA requirements, "Preclude locomotion without the aid of braces, crutches, canes, or a wheelchair."

  • The loss, or loss of use, of both upper extremities, so as to preclude use of the arms at or above the elbows.

  • The permanent and total disability is due to a severe burn injury as determined by the VA.

According to the VA, the official disability rating is used to make the determination, but that rating is subject to review and is not considered "permanent" once the determination is made. This would indicate that a veteran has the possibility of appealing a decision to decline the grant, but chances are the VA would require a new review

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